Write, Weather, Mood

Have you ever noticed how much the weather affects your day-to-day life?

 It’s not just whether it’s raining or cold; it’s the whole feeling of the weather.

On sunny days, you’ll find people smile more and they are more apt to greet you kindly and engage in conversation with you. If it’s one of those perfect weather days, we’ll even prolong the conversation to stay outside to enjoy the weather.

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 Copyright: <a href='http://www.123rf.com/profile_nyul'>nyul / 123RF Stock Photo

On a cold rainy day, people barely even look up at you as you walk by. If words are exchange, the  conversation is grumbling about the weather.

As a writer, I’m amazed at how much the weather affects my mood for writing as well.

Seriously, it’s kind of hard to plan a deep dark murder or some villainous crime on a bright sunny day when you’re sitting by the beach. These are the days when I am more in the mood for writing a funny scene or even a romantic one.

However, if you’re curled up inside shivering because of the cold and it’s overcast and rain is hitting the panes of glass of your windows, well that’s different. On a day like this, it doesn’t take too much to put you in the dark mood to write a dark scene. Plots of murder and misdeeds are easy to put down on paper. I have no qualms about putting my main characters in a miserable situation. If I’m miserable, then they can be, too.

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Copyright: <a href=’http://www.123rf.com/profile_stieberszabolcs’>stieberszabolcs / 123RF Stock Photo

Unfortunately, as a mystery writer, I can’t wait for dark rainy days to write about a murder. My imagination must work overtime to create the mood or scene I’m working on at that moment.  That’s when I often will use other stimuli to help me get in the right frame of mind. Music is a big component as I write, setting the mood for the writing I wish to accomplish. Often going online and looking at pictures (I love Pinterest!) will spark the needed thought process. After all, a picture of a lethal weapon can lead to thoughts of crime.

If these methods don’t work for me, then I find it best to go ahead and write a scene that will fit my mood. I will sneak it into my work in progress later. Or, maybe, put it away in a file to be used in another book.

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No matter what the weather ,as a writer it is important to take control of your work. You should write every day, 1 to 2 paragraphs or 1 to 2 chapters. And if that fails, pick up a book and read someone else’s words. You’ll be amazed at how much this will spark your imagination!

Tell Me A Story!

Tell me a story…

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“Tell me a story”, these words can create a wonderfully bonding experience between a child and their parent. And what parent doesn’t want to have that tender memory. Many of us spent hours reading to our children when they were young. Our children became great readers because they grew up with the foundation of being read to. Every night we could be found reading our own favorite stories to them; God knows, I read Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss to my son so many times, that now 18 years later I can still recite it.

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There are so many wonderful books out there that can teach children how to read and provide gentle life lessons and the basics of how to communicate. But how lucky is the child that has the parent who can create their own stories! Stories that will be a special memory for the two of them. This pre-school experience of creating a story from nothing will stick with the child for years because they’ll know that their father or mother created that story for them just on a whim.

I can remember my son showing me something like a picture of seashell or flower and asking a question about the story behind it. The bumblebee sitting in a trip at a flower would bring a string of questions like; “What’s it doing mommy? Where’s it going to go next? Why does it stop that flower?” As any parent knows, once the questions begin, they can be never-ending, especially at bedtime! But if you can create a story from just one of those random thoughts, your child will remember it for years, and as an adult you might be surprised to hear them reciting your made-up story to their own children.

As a writer as a challenge to look at a picture and see beyond the still life in front of you. It becomes a source of incentive, imagination, and inspiration. To look at the picture and create a story from it, is a gift to be used and shared. Just what the writer creates can be something wonderful. Think about it; you can make up your own country, your own world, and your own grand adventures. You can create a tale that tells the story between a husband and wife, brother and sister, or best friends.

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So my challenge to you; create a story for your child, create a story for yourself, create a story to share with the world.
There is a picture out there just waiting for you to put it to words!